This meeting is for educational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice. You want to know how I know that? Because I just told you. What I am about to share with you is just for educational purposes, It may not apply to your specific situation. I’m going to talk in general terms, We’re going to talk about what Georgia law provides in the area of decision making for incapacitated adults but that does not mean that it applies to your specific situation. So this meeting and discussion does not substitute you sitting down with an attorney who can talk to you about your specific circumstance, what your specific goals are and help you formulate strategies to achieve those specific goals. I make some presumptions when I make a presentation like this and I’m going to presume that you’re here for a reason, that a biological or adoptive descendent of yours has special needs limiting their ability to communicate significant responsible decisions concerning health, safety, or welfare. I see some folks nodding their heads, so I think I’m in the right room. It’s kind of easy, not many people on a Saturday morning, especially a Saturday morning as nice as today, would choose to come here to this presentation, especially from a lawyer. I appreciate you being here. Guardianship is important when the child reaches the age of eighteen. Eighteen is the magic age. Under the age of eighteen, natural parents and adoptive parents or the court-appointed guardian are the guardians. If you are the natural or the adoptive parent, you do not need to go to court to be named their guardian if they are under the age of eighteen, you are the guardian. On the eighteenth birthday, however the law automatically grants each person all rights and responsibilities as an adult. That means they can contract, enter into marriages, they can consent to medical treatment, they can refuse medical treatments, they can decide where to live. All of these wonderful things happen on the eighteenth birthday